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Homo sapiens, GSP Style by nemo-ramjet Homo sapiens, GSP Style by nemo-ramjet
The late Holocene running predator "Homo sapiens."

Some specimens of this animal were found with trace fossils of hair near its head. Its restoration with similar integument near its arms here is tentative.

This animal shared its habitat with the vicious, sickle-clawed, pack-hunting "Cat," the long-necked "Horse," and the sail-backed "Cow."
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:iconshamusworld:
ShamusWorld Featured By Owner Feb 21, 2015
woah woah woah wait
this is what we were SUPPOSED to look like?
omg #3fab5me 
but really i can't tell if the description is serious or not lol
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:iconbigfootrules:
bigfootRULES Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2014  Student Writer
there are some theories stating that the humans were a advanced civilization that had wiped themselves out by nuclear war, but scientists have dismissed them as stories made by paranoid crackpots.
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:iconcoloanas:
Coloanas Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2014  Hobbyist Artist
Makes me wonder, there was a thick layer of iridium in the strata during the late Mesozoic. Perhaps the cause of the K-Pg extinction were sapient dinosaurs!
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:icononlyclock:
OnlyClock Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2014
How will they ever know how glorious we looked when our plumage was cresting?
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:icontraheripteryx:
Traheripteryx Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Nowadays, we know, that "humans" hadn't an upright position, like this. Also, "humans" were semi-aquatic.
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:icontraheripteryx:
Traheripteryx Featured By Owner Jun 2, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Did you hear about the medium sized omnivore "pigs"? It's said, that they are possible relatives of the ancient "cows". They lived near together in "barn" buildings... Maybe some kind of hive, built by them. It could be possible, that they are the same species.
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:iconthediremoose:
thediremoose Featured By Owner May 23, 2013
Meanwhile, the "Dog," although often considered an active predator due to its large teeth and long legs, must really have been a scavenger due to the lack of sharp claws. Furthermore, its large olfactory lobe clearly indicates it was adapted for tracking down carcasses. Its larger size compared to a cat was obviously for scaring packs of cats away from their kills.

After all, we know cats had to have been pack hunters due to evidence from the larger but closely-related "Lion."
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:iconrexyf:
Rexyf Featured By Owner Apr 3, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Was just thinking, could you imagine how future paleontologists would interprit an Ant-Eater? "Clearly some manner of nectar feeding herbivore, moving about from flower to flower like a massive butterfly, using its claws for self-defence."
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:icontonerebellion:
tonerebellion Featured By Owner Mar 5, 2013
If you ever color this specimen, I suggest using vivid, bright colors in elaborate patterns (of red, green, yellow and orange, for example) . Anatomical studies have shown that members of this genus had well developed eyes, as well as the accompanying areas corresponding to vision in the brain, but a comparatively poorly developed sense of smell, unlike related genera of mammals. Although speculative, it is entirely possible that these animals would actually have been able to distinguish a variety of colors, and if so, they would likely have possessed vivid coloration to facilitate social interactions - for example, for mating purposes and intra-species recognition (which is doubly plausible considering that they probably could not use scent for this purpose, owing to their relatively underdeveloped olfactory sense). Otherwise, I fully endorse this restoration and expect to be seeing full, life sized reconstructions mounted in our finest museums in the near future, so that all may admire these magnificent creatures as they must have looked like while they still roamed this world!
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:iconhomfrog:
homfrog Featured By Owner Sep 5, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
That's called clothing. That's what we do with clothing.
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:icontonerebellion:
tonerebellion Featured By Owner Sep 11, 2014
True, but we didn't evolve with clothing, it's just something we've been using in the last few thousand years (compared to the hundreds of thousands and millions of years that our species and genus has been around). We can also fly (with aircraft) and "see" x-rays now, but we didn't evolve with that ability either. Humans use technology to do all kinds of things.

In any case, primate ancestors of Homo Sapiens probably evolved color vision to help with distinguishing fruit (ripe from unripe, for example), but it's easy to see how a future scientist might arrive at the erroneous conclusion that we were a biologically brightly colored species and reconstruct us as such, though in actual fact, we are not - at least not compared to many birds and reptiles, for example!
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:iconookaookaooka:
ookaookaooka Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
"Sail-backed cow" lol :)
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:iconirkenarmada1:
Irkenarmada1 Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The late Holocene is distinguished from other time periods by the strange sedimentary materials and the large number of extinctions. It is unknown how many life forms became extinct during this time. Homo sapiens itself has been proposed as having a central role in these peculiarities, but it is now commonly believed that this is improbable.
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:iconirkenarmada1:
Irkenarmada1 Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Great work.
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:iconpreradkor:
Preradkor Featured By Owner Dec 3, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I just imagined how strange would look reconstruction based on skeleton of earth vertebrate (like human) made by aliens with external skeleton, who had never seen any creature with internal bones. Tey would probably try to place most of bones outside body. That would be eerie. Maybe it is also good idea to draw? :D
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:iconsimkoning:
SimKoning Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2012
I'm not sure if this is a fair criticism. Mammals typically have considerably more flesh over their heads and the musculature in the legs is quite different. If you look at a naked bird, you'll see that they typically do in fact have the "shrink wrapped" look seen in GSP's restorations. The lack of a protruding calcaneus and generally different muscle shape gives bird legs a "drumstick" look, with little more than tendons, skin and bone on the lower legs and feet. Greg Paul was putting feathers on dinosaurs, even the ornithischians (including baby hadrosaurids), so I'm not sure why this restoration has so little hair.

It would be more fair to guess how a distant future alien paleoartist might reconstruct a human by using extant mammal species as a reference. I would bet that it would be constructed without claws, lots of hair, lips, outer ears that might look too pointed or long and possibly a flat, ape like nose. I think it would look closer to us than what you depicted here.
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2012
I agree with your objections - this picture is intended as a critique of sparse palaeoreconstructions in general rather than an attack on GSP.
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:iconsimkoning:
SimKoning Featured By Owner Aug 6, 2012
Well now I just feel stupid.... lol
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:iconraptorman123:
raptorman123 Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2012
I am a relic of the time of humans. I watched their race leave this planet for pastures new. Those that didn't were annihilated by the malevolent Martians, who had been drawn back to their home solar system by a possible threat to their survival. I cannot explain what they looked like, as their bodies were a work of art, something no land-dwelling squid will ever understand. I was once human, but I am now a vampire, forced to walk the Earth for eternity. Picture me without iridescent skin/fangs and you only get a small glimpse of the long-gone humans. *sobs*
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:iconkazuma27:
Kazuma27 Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Ah, so FRIGGIN' true in regards to how many people restore dinosaurs and other prehistoric critters :D
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:iconkingcarnagh:
kingcarnagh Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
i'm not sure i folllow.... how is this a homo sapien?
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Jul 30, 2012
Not a "real" person, but a person reconstructed as we seem to be reconstructing most of our dinosaurs...
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:iconkingcarnagh:
kingcarnagh Featured By Owner Aug 1, 2012  Professional Traditional Artist
ah, i see. well, it's very inventive, i really like it! is it humankinds' ancestors or descendants or what?
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:iconouroboros-491:
Ouroboros-491 Featured By Owner Oct 28, 2014
Not quite.
You see, when scientists try and imagine what creatures might have looked like, using only fossil evidence as a guide, the creatures we imagine are probably significantly different then what they probably looked like.
Consider what a person who had never seen a swan might imagine when only given the bones. They would probably imagine the skin wrapping tightly to the bone, the body held upright to walk on land, the arms skewering blades to capture small animals. This made up swan would be a fearsome and unsettling creature. And that's just the swans, imagine what they would think a whale, or a hippopotamus looks like.
That's why so many different theories exist on how ancient creatures lived and looked, because we know so little about them. To future Paleontologist, humans would probably look like some offshoot of the great apes that evolved adaptions for high speed chasing.
Oh, and here's the swan picture, if you're interested. 
i.crackedcdn.com/phpimages/art…      
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2012
Err, there's a big problem with your restoration: Homo sapiens was actually covered in scales, as there is no evidence of hair. ;)
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2012
At least it's not as wild as some theories out there - that these animals covered themselves in patches of plant and animal fiber!!
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:icontyrannosaurusprime:
TyrannosaurusPrime Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2012
LOL:XD: Those are actually spikes.;)
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:iconchimpeetah:
Chimpeetah Featured By Owner Apr 11, 2012
It's funny...today I saw a rhino skull and then I pictured what it's future depictions would be like. Some alien ceratopsian with a toothy beak and a nasal sac, no one would dare picture any additional keratin horns as skin imprints showed no hair, a skinny neck, and a spine-supported sail, a stocky body, and slim legs with odd joints and weird toes. Scientists believe it was hunted by the mega-predatory Hippo, with it's fearsome and showy tusks, as their oddly proportioned cousins, the Elephants, would compete with one another with their odd beetle like horns and sound off with that incredible auditory sac on their foreheads.
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:iconchimpeetah:
Chimpeetah Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2012
Now thinking about it...imagine how cetaceans would be reconstructed !
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2012
Darren Naish and Cameron Mc Cormick have both made illustrations about this issue :)
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:iconchimpeetah:
Chimpeetah Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2012
You can't just tell me something like that and not provide links haha
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2012
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:iconchimpeetah:
Chimpeetah Featured By Owner Mar 28, 2012
Thanks, though i actually found the site a while back and was pretty amused. I think I might have monitor versions of these things in my project (in an odd twist of reality future paleontologists that that reality reconstruct them with melons and pudgy bodies).
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:iconthemacronian:
TheMacronian Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I'm seeing something satiric here.

I agree, for GSP style REALLY bugs me.
That's why my dinosaurs be muscular.
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2012
I actually have great respect for GSP - it's the unquestioning copying of his style that has become an irritating trend...
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:iconthemacronian:
TheMacronian Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Indeed.
Irritating to to the point of my categorizing paleoart;

In the styles of Sibbick and Gurney, I have dubbed this virgin paleoart, which is to say it is paleoart not influenced by GSP and or Jurassic Park.

Anything else is either Luis V. Rey, GSP, or Hartman.
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:iconelsqiubbonator:
ElSqiubbonator Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2012
I think if there's any animal that would give future paleontologists a problem, it's the dog. I mean, the different breeds all look like separate species, yet we know a Chihuahua is the same animal as a St Bernard.
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2012
[link] Indeed, they might not even put them in the same family!
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:icontarawynworldwalker:
TarawynWorldwalker Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2012  Student General Artist
The idea that they represent different species is preposterous- clearly we are looking at a growth series! You can clearly see the proportions of the smaller specimen's skull demonstrates juvenile characteristics, and everyone knows there are never two or more similar-looking species with overlapping ranges at a given time. :facepalm: HONESTLY.
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2012
:P
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:iconramul:
Ramul Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2012
And no word about the saber-toothed ambush predators, the pigs?
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2012
Ah, yes... Those, plus the weird, arboreal "birds," which caught their insect prey with mantis-like arms.
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:iconramul:
Ramul Featured By Owner Jan 11, 2012
Or the hive-forming dogs, whose amount of castes would but every termite species to shame.
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2012
Speaking of ants and dogs, the many pets us people have are rather similar to the myriad types of commensal insects, etc. that live in ant colonies...
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:icongrazatt:
grazatt Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2012
Why do they think
"vicious, sickle-clawed, pack-hunting "Cat," the long-necked "Horse," and the sail-backed "Cow."
Where did they get those ideas from?
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2012
If you only had the animals' skeletons to work with, you could conclude that cow's skeletons supported a skin-sail on their backs, and cats were vicious hunters with extensible claws.
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:icongrazatt:
grazatt Featured By Owner Jan 2, 2012
but cats are vicious hunters with extendible claws aren't they?
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:iconnemo-ramjet:
nemo-ramjet Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2012
Yes, but not like this; [link]
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:icondaggerviper:
DaggerViper Featured By Owner Dec 29, 2011
Lawl that moment of disappointment when you realize you weren't the first to have this idea xD

Nicely cooked food for thought you present here!

Hmm... Here's cookies for thought: how would them future sentient species interpret the dinosaur bones we dug up?

"This animal shared its habitat with the sickle-clawed, pack-hunting 'Cat,' the long-necked 'Horse,' the sail-backed 'Cow,' and the gigantic super predator 'T-fucking-Rex'... Which miraculously reappeared after a 65-million year-long absence."
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